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Nikifor Seliverstov
Nikifor Seliverstov

Where To Buy Strontium ^HOT^



There were, however, significant increases in both heart attacks and blood clots (including pulmonary embolism) in patients taking strontium ranelate compared to those who were not. Strontium ranelate is associated with other harmful effects, including serious skin reactions, disturbances in thinking, seizures, liver inflammation, and reduced numbers of red blood cells.




where to buy strontium



Strontium ranelate has never been approved in the U.S. The forms of strontium available over-the-counter in the U.S. or on the Internet are usually strontium citrate or strontium chloride. These forms are different from the ranelate compound and there have been no studies showing that they are safe or effective. Do not be misled by marketing materials that compare them to strontium ranelate.


Strontium is similar to calcium. It seems to play a role in how your body makes new bone while it slows the breakdown of old bone. That means it may affect how strong your bones are. Some research says that women with osteoporosis may not absorb strontium as they should.


In Australia and some countries in Europe, a form of strontium called strontium ranelate (Osseor Protelos) is available as a prescription medication to treat and prevent osteoporosis and bone fractures. Because strontium ranelate is a weak anti-resorptive agent and there are more effective osteoporosis agents in the United States and most countries, we do not use strontium ranelate in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis.


Strontium is a natural trace mineral in our soil. And citrate means citric acid from fruits like lemons and oranges. Strontium Boost combines strontium with citrate because citrate lowers our body's acid levels.


This Public Health Statement is the summary chapter from the Toxicological Profile for strontium. It is one in a series of Public Health Statements about hazardous substances and their health effects. A shorter version, the ToxFAQsTM, is also available. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are present. For more information, call the ATSDR Information Center at 1-800-232-4636.


The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identifies the most serious hazardous waste sites in the nation. These sites make up the National Priorities List (NPL) and are the sites targeted for long-term federal cleanup activities. Strontium and strontium-90 have been found in at least 102 and 12 of the 1,636 current or former NPL sites, respectively. However, the total number of NPL sites evaluated for strontium and strontium-90 are not known. As more sites are evaluated, the sites at which strontium and strontium-90 are found may increase. This information is important because exposure to strontium and strontium-90 may harm you and because these sites may be sources of exposure.


If you are exposed to strontium, many factors determine whether you'll be harmed. These factors include the dose (how much), the duration (how long), and how you come in contact with it. You must also consider the other chemicals you're exposed to and your age, sex, diet, family traits, lifestyle, and state of health.


Strontium is a natural and commonly occurring element. Strontium can exist in two oxidation states: 0 and +2. Under normal environmental conditions, only the +2 oxidation state is stable enough to be important. Pure strontium is a hard, white-colored metal, but this form is not found in the environment. Rather, strontium is usually found in nature in the form of minerals. Strontium can form a variety of compounds. Strontium compounds do not have any particular smell. There are two types of strontium compounds, those that dissolve in water and those that do not. Natural strontium is not radioactive and exists in four stable types (or isotopes), each of which can be written as 84Sr, 86Sr, 87Sr, and 88Sr, and read as strontium eighty-four, strontium eighty-six, etc. All four isotopes behave the same chemically, so any combination of the four would have the same chemical effect on your body.


Rocks, soil, dust, coal, oil, surface and underground water, air, plants, and animals all contain varying amounts of strontium. Typical concentrations in most materials are a few parts per million (ppm). Strontium ore is found in nature as the minerals celestite (SrSO4) and strontianite (SrCO3). After the strontium is extracted from strontium ore, it is concentrated into strontium carbonate or other chemical forms by a series of chemical processes. Strontium compounds, such as strontium carbonate, are used in making ceramics and glass products, pyrotechnics, paint pigments, fluorescent lights, medicines, and other products.


Strontium can also exist as radioactive isotopes. 90Sr, or strontium ninety, is the most hazardous of the radioactive isotopes of the chemical element strontium. 90Sr is formed in nuclear reactors or during the explosion of nuclear weapons. Each radioactive element, including strontium, constantly gives off radiation, and this process changes it into an isotope of another element or a different isotope of the same element. This process is called radioactive decay. 90Sr gives off beta particles (sometimes referred to as beta radiation) and turns into yttrium ninety (90Y); 90Y is also radioactive and gives off radiation to form zirconium ninety (90Zr), which is a stable isotope. The radioactive half-life is the time that it takes for half of a radioactive strontium isotope to give off its radiation and change into a different element. 90Sr has a half-life of 29 years.


Quantities of radioactive strontium, as well as other radioactive elements, are measured in units of mass (grams) or radioactivity (curies or becquerels). Both the curie (Ci) and the becquerel (Bq) tell us how much a radioactive material decays every second. The becquerel is a new international unit known as the SI unit, and the curie is an older unit; both are used currently. A becquerel is the amount of radioactive material in which 1 atom transforms every second. One curie is the amount of radioactive material in which 37 billion atoms transform every second; this is approximately the radioactivity of 1 gram of radium.


Stable and radioactive strontium compounds in the air are present as dust. Emissions from burning coal and oil increase stable strontium levels in air. The average amount of strontium that has been measured in air from different parts of the United States is 20 nanograms per cubic meter (a nanogram is a trillion times smaller than a gram). Most of the strontium in air is in the form of stable strontium. Very small dust particles of stable and radioactive strontium in the air fall out of the air onto surface water, plant surfaces, and soil either by themselves or when rain or snow falls. These particles of strontium eventually end up back in the soil or in the bottoms of lakes, rivers, and ponds, where they stay and mix with stable and radioactive strontium that is already there.


In water, most forms of stable and radioactive strontium are dissolved. Stable strontium that is dissolved in water comes from strontium in rocks and soil that water runs over and through. Only a very small part of the strontium found in water is from the settling of strontium dust out of the air.


Some strontium is suspended in water. Typically, the amount of strontium that has been measured in drinking water in different parts of the United States by the EPA is less than 1 milligram for every liter of water (1 mg/L). 90Sr in water comes primarily from the settling of 90Sr dust out of the air. Some 90Sr is suspended in water. In general, the amount of 90Sr that has been measured in drinking water in different parts of the United States by EPA is less than one tenth of a picocurie for every liter of water (0.1 pCi/L or 0.004 Bq/L).


Strontium is found naturally in soil in amounts that vary over a wide range, but the typical concentration is 0.2 milligrams per kilogram (kg) of soil (or 0.2 mg/kg). The disposal of coal ash, incinerator ash, and industrial wastes may increase the concentration of strontium in soil. Generally, the amount of 90Sr in soil is very small and is only a fraction of the total concentration of strontium in soil. Higher concentrations of 90Sr in soil may be found near hazardous waste sites, radioactive waste sites, and Department of Energy facilities located around the United States. A major portion of stable and radioactive strontium in soil dissolves in water, so it is likely to move deeper into the ground and enter groundwater. However, strontium compounds may stay in the soil for years without moving downward into groundwater. In the environment, chemical reactions can change the water-soluble stable and radioactive strontium compounds into insoluble forms. In some cases, water-insoluble strontium compounds can change to soluble forms.


Strontium is found nearly everywhere in small amounts, and you can be exposed to low levels of strontium by breathing air, eating food, drinking water, or accidentally eating soil or dust that contains strontium. Food and drinking water are the largest sources of exposure to strontium. Because of the nature of strontium, some of it gets into fish, vegetables, and livestock. Grain, leafy vegetables, and dairy products contribute the greatest percentage of dietary strontium to humans. The concentration of strontium in leafy vegetables, such as cabbage, grown in the United States is less than 64 mg in a kg of the fresh vegetables (i.e., 64 ppm). For most people, the intake of strontium will be moderate.


90Sr is found nearly everywhere in small amounts from past nuclear accidents and fallout from nuclear explosions. You can be exposed to low levels of 90Sr by eating food, drinking water, or accidentally eating soil or dust that contains 90Sr. Food and drinking water are the largest sources of exposure to 90Sr. Because of the nature of 90Sr, some of it gets into fish, vegetables, and livestock. Grain, leafy vegetables, and dairy products contribute the greatest percentage of dietary 90Sr to humans. The concentration of 90Sr in fresh vegetables grown in the United States is less than 9 pCi (or 0.3 Bq) in 1 kg of dried vegetables (in a hot oven). The intake of radioactive strontium for most people will be small. You can take in more 90Sr if you eat food that was grown on a radioactive strontium-contaminated hazardous waste site. 041b061a72


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